Baha'i Library Online

See original version at bahai-library.com/momen_power_bahai_community.

COLLECTIONPublished articles
TITLEPower and the Bahá'í community
AUTHOR 1Moojan Momen
DATE_THIS2018
VOLUME19
TITLE_PARENTLights of Irfan
PAGE_RANGE209-232
PUB_THISHaj Mehdi Arjmand Colloquium
CITY_THISWilmette
ABSTRACTWhile Bahá'í social teachings may have sounded new and exciting a century ago, that is no longer the case today. The problem the world faces is not in the principles that would lead to a better society, but in their application.
NOTES Mirrored with permission from irfancolloquia.org/54/momen_power.
TAGS* Institute process; - Administration; - Philosophy; - Teaching Plans; Alienation; Authority; Business; Centralization; Charity and relief work; Competition; Consultation; Corruption; Covenant; Covenant-breakers; Crime; Education; Elections; Empowerment; Environment; Equality; Ethics; European Union; Freedom and liberty; Fundamentalism; Gender; Individualism; Institutions; Interpretation; Justice; Laws; Materialism; Maturity; Media; Minorities; New Age; Obedience; Participation; Peace; Politics; Power; Promise of World Peace (statement); Punishment; Reflection; Reform; Revolution (general); Service; Social action; Spiritual Assemblies; Theology; Unity; Unity in diversity; Violence; War; Wealth and poverty; Women
 
CONTENT
Abstract: Bahá’ís frequently claim that the Bahá’í teachings have the ability to create a new social order, a new way of organising human society such that individuals could develop themselves physically, mentally and spiritually to the utmost of their capability. When trying to explain what this new social order is, they present the list of social teachings that was enunciated by ‘Abdu’l-Bahá during his journeys to the West a hundred years ago: the oneness of humanity, the equality of women and men, the need for harmony and balance between religion and science, the importance of education and so on. While these social teachings may have sounded new and exciting a century ago, that is no longer the case today.

The problem the world faces is not in the principles that would lead to a better society but in the application. In its 1985 statement, The Promise of World Peace, the Universal House of Justice offered up the Bahá’í community as a model for the world to examine.

VIEWS2708 views since 2018-11-27 (last edit 2018-11-27 19:26 UTC)
PERMISSIONauthor and publisher
LANG THISEnglish
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