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Abstract:
50 news clippings from an "independent paper devoted to the interests of the people" that were found searching newspaper archives for Bahá'í keywords.
Notes:
See all text below collated in this Microsoft Word document (proofread by E. Jones, 2023).

The project of finding these old clippings depends on the status of OCR based searches, which are never 100% — there are always going to be more present than found, and results will also vary over time as OCR re-processing is often redone on collections as methodologies improve. [-S.K., 2023]

The Advocate was privately owned by Mr. and Mrs. E.D. Cannady and incorporated many articles on the Bahá'í Faith and listed many early Baha'is; a bit of history for the Portland community. [E. Jones, 2023]

See also 50,000 Newspaper Clippings from newspapers.com.


Oregon Newspaper Archive

compiled by Steven Kolins
published in The Advocate
Portland, OR: 1923-1927
Proofread text PDF image scan with OCR
CLIPPING #: 1
https://oregonnews.uoregon.edu/lccn/sn98062568/1923-05-05/ed-1/seq-4/
Article Title: The advocate, May 05, 1923, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 5, 1923

FEAST OF EL RIZWAN

Saturday evening, the 28th, more than half an hundred of friends met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. latimer, 397 East 38th street N., in Rose City Park, through invitation of the hosts, to participate in and enjoy the Feast of the EL Riswan. EL Riswan is a Persian word, the meaning of which is the combination of host, invitations and guests. The majority of those in attendance were Bahaists or friends of the movement, which teaches the brotherhood of man and the fatherhood of God. A delightful program was enjoyed, in which George Latimer gave a brief explanation of the feast, a resume of his trip to the Holy Land, where he visited, ate, and talked with the late Abdul Baha; a group of Cadman's pieces, and the Juba dance by Nathaniel Dett were played by Mrs Daisy Hunt. Dr. Minard, of the Divine Science church, gave a brief talk on unity; Mrs. Baker, a sister-in-law of Ray Stannard Baker, here from California, gave an interesting talk on the "Soul"; Mrs. Latimer read a delightful letter, written at sea, from Miss Martha Root, who is now teaching the cause in Japan. The letter was most charming and was brimful of information and love for the friends in America. Mrs. E. D. Cannady gave a talk of her association and knowledge of the work, and expressed deep appreciation for the beautiful teaching of Abdul Baha and Baha O'llah. Following the spiritual side of the feast, the guests participated in the material side, which consisted of delicious ice cream, cakes, candies, coffee, etc. During the social hour. Mrs. Cannady sang. Others noted among the guests were Mrs. Jack Gulliford ot Dawson. Y. T., and Mrs. Ruth Flowers of East First street.

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Article Title: The advocate, June 02, 1923, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 2, 1923

THE FEAST OF THE BAB

A very delightful evening was enjoyed at the home of Mr.and Mrs. J. W.Latimer, 397 East 38th street North. Wednesday, when members and friends of the Bahai movement met to commemorate the advent of the announcer of the teachers of the religion,The Bab.

George Latimer, in a very interesting and vivid manner told of the life and work of the Bab, Mohamud Effendi, up to and including his martyrdom. This was followed by a vocal solo by Mrs. E. D. Cannady. Mrs. Wm. Reese gave a group of readings which were beautifully done and heartily received. New faces noted in the group of more than half an hundred were Mesdames E. J. Magruder and Wm.Reese and A. H. Morrow.

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Article Title: The advocate, August 04, 1923, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 4, 1923

BAHAI ASSEMBLY NEWS
Room 312 Central Building

Public Invited
Every Friday Evening

On last Friday it was the good fortune of all who attended to hear a very illuminating address by Miss A. Glenn of Seattle from the subject “A New Call to Old Ideas.” Miss Glenn is an active Bahaist and makes a splendid representative of the teachings of the brotherhood of man. Miss Glen explained some of the principles of the Bahai philosophy and told how the nine leading teachers of religion have appeared in different ages and instructed people in the language which people coaid best understand which was adapted to their respective civilisations. "When Christ made his advent and gave His law of love, the people of that time had advanced in powers of perception and therefore an 'eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth' were no more” she said, and added: "Baha O'llah and Abdul Baha taught the people in accordance with their present day powers of perception.”

Miss Glenn said, in speaking of their departure from the world.

Miss. Glenn said:

"They leave physically but leave a renewal of the age-old ideals or principles of God-like perfection." The Bahai philosophy will erase all boundary lines, she said, not only of states but of nations, as the spirit of the age is stealing over them unawares. The speaker said that many are clinging to their old traditions and missing the beautiful spirit of the age while others are enjoying it. "Heretofore we have not recognized the oneness of humanity but we have now; we have learned that we are really not only part of each other but are really each other, and whatever we do to each other, we are doing to ourselves." She compared the Bahai revelation to the diamond and said that as the diamond possessed all the colors, yet it becomes a perfect white stone, so the Bahai religion represents a blending --- a universalizing of all religions to a perfect one.

Miss Cinita Nunan and Mr. A. Peterson told of their trip to California where they spent a most pleasant time as the guests of Mr. and Mr.s John Bosh at Geyserville, California. Miss Nunan's description of her visit with her brother Paul Allen at Laguna Beach, whom she had not seen for more than 13 years, was most interesting. And perhaps the most significant thing about it was. she found that her brother was méditating on and studying the same philosophy as she was, although up until she came be had not heard of the Bahai philosophy.

Mrs C. Wass presided over the meeting. Mr. Bowman read the prayer and Mrs. D. G. Hunt rendered the musical number
Miss Glenn is visiting with Mrs. George . Latimer. 397 East 38th street. North, for several weeks.
Dr. E. C. Pierce. 431 Benton street, will address the assembly on “Psycho-analysis" Friday evening, the 10th.

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Article Title: The advocate, February 09, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Feb. 9, 1924

NOTED ARCHITECT VISITS

Charles Mason Remey of Boston, Mass. spent several days in the city this week as the house guest of Mr. and Mrs. George W. Latimer, 397 E 38th street, N. Mr. Remey gave several lectures at the Metaphysical Library during his stay here and was royally entertained by numerous friends. His extensive travels both in this country and abroad, his keen insight into human nature and international questions make him a most interesting conversationalist.

Mr. Remey is a staunch disciple of the teachings of Abdul Baha, and was a member of a party of believers who visited the wonderful teacher in the holy land before he passed a little more than a year ago.

In speaking of the "Race question” Mr Remey’s idea of an ideal society where every individual not only tolerates every other individual, but actually loves. He says that the different races have a great attraction for each other and until the spiritual and moral ideal of social intercourse formed, there will always be misunderstanding and strife as a result of the physical relations between the races. Mr. Remey’s talks were highly educational and illuminating.

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Article Title: The advocate, March 15, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 15, 1924

WELL KNOWN BAHAI TEACHER HERE

Mrs. Ida Finch of Seattle, who has been teaching the Bahai principles to the natives in Japan and China, is spending a week or ten days in Portland as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer, 397 East 38th St. North. Mrs. Finch delivered a wonderful address on Spiritual Successes at the Center in the Central Building, Friday evening, the 14th, to an appreciative audience. `

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Article Title: The advocate, March 29, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 29, 1924

MRS. FINCH AN EXCELLENT SPEAKER

Before a group of Interested ones a few evenings ago, Mrs. Ida Finch recently returned from Japan, discussed "Successive Divine Manifestations." Mrs Finch said that everything moved in a cycle and that the advanced age required advanced teachers. She said that Abdul Baha was the promised one, and that just as Christ in His time taught the people spiritually, so did Abdul Baha in this day. Music was furnished by Mrs. Saunders.

Mrs. Finch, who Is the houseguest of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer, has filled a number of speaking engagements since coming to Portland, and has been royally entertained socially.

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Article Title: The advocate, March 29, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 29, 1924

A GRIPPING STORY OF CHINA’S AWAKENING

Many readers of The Advocate will remember the lovely, beautiful soul Martha Root who sojourned amongst us a little while, giving of her precious thoughts and radiating her love before she sailed to do her great work in China. Through the kindness of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. LatUmer our Interest has been aroused in the Bahai movement which is attracting the attention of thinking people all over the world as a means to the solution of the various problems which exist among men today, and for the privilege of revealing the contents of the marvelous manuscript, the first installment of which here follows, and the remainder will be published in successive weekly installments:

    CHINA TODAY
    By Martha L. Root

    No country in the world today is viewed with more intense interest than is China---China with its population of more than 43S,OOO,OOO souls. If the population of Austria-Hungary, Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, England, Scotland, Ireland, Wales, Japan, Serbia and Roumania had all been wiped out in the great war, these countries could have been repopulated by Chinese and leave enough residents in China to give a population as dense as that of the United States. The present republic of China extends over an area of about five million square miles; a great deal more than twice that of the United States. This estimate, of course, includes Mongolia, Manchuria, Tibet and Eastern Turkestan, in addition to the eighteen provinces which make up China proper. For a traveler to encircle China he will need to journey a distance considerably greater than half the circumference of the globe.

    China will be the country of the future. With her great population and her vast latent resources hardly touched, she has immense potential.

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Article Title: The advocate, April 19, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 19, 1924

CHINA TODAY
By Martha Root

(Continued from last week)

The ancient Confucian God idea, five thousand years ago, was monotheism. It was a great preparation for later world teachers. It recognized a power above, great, benificent and just, who rewards virtue and punishes vice, and who can be aproached in prayer.

Shangti or T'ien (these words mean to the Chinese what God means to the westerner) gives birth to the people, gives blessing to the good and woes to the evil. He ordains the social order, the religious and social ceremonies and human virtues. He sends down rain. He is gracious to men and helps them. His will is unerring. He does not shorten men's lives, they do that themselves. He is not bound to individuals by ties of biased human affection. He commands men to rectify their character. He gives man his nature, compassionates him and grants his desires. He is only moved by virtue, but men may cry and weep and pray to Him. for He will hear." Christians say "We know that God is personal.” Confucianists say, "We do not know, for we have no way of finding out what God is like." This agnosticism is characteristic of the Chinese. God exists but he remains the unknowable. This the creed of Confucianism.

Now a new spirit dawn is rising over China -- the Bahai movement is lighting columns of the newspapers, universities, colleges, normal schools and middle schools, churches and other orginazatlons are offering their platforms for lectures on the universal principles of Baha'u’llah. Colleges. Confucianist, Christian, Mohammedan, Buddhist, Taoist and agnostic have given Invitations to lecture, and these were accepted.

(To be continued.)

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Article Title: The advocate, April 26, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 26, 1924

CHINA TODAY
(By Martha Root).

(Continued from last week.)

Newspapers have run series of articles, feature stories, [as printed] cut of Abdul Baha and of the Bahai temple in Chicago. These papers were Chinese, English, Japanese (in China), Russian and even Bolshevist journals have carried the universal principles.

Abdul Baha, the center of the covenant of the Bahai revelation, had great hopes of China. He said: "In China one can teach many souls, train and educate such divine personages, each one of whom may become the bright candle of the world of humanity. Truly, I say they are free from any deceit and hypocrisies, and are prompted with ideal motives." The vast republic of China seems to be a nation "prepared” by five thousand years getting ready for the universal principles of Bahá'u'lláh. The people are attracted to the Bahai movement because its basic Ideals are "big enough,” as they say, "for them." Consider these principles.

1. The oneness of the world of humanity --- this agrees with their Confucian teaching "All within the four seas are brethren."

2. Independent investigation of truth --- It is one of the main aims of the Renaissance movement.

(To be continued.)

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Article Title: The advocate, May 10, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 10, 1924

"SPEAKER AT BAHAI CONGRESS ATTACKS NORDIC SUPERIORITY "

REV. JOHNSON HERMAN RANDALL DECLARES SCIENCE PROVES HUMANS OF ALL RACES ARE EQUAL --- SAYS CAUCASIANS NOT IN CLASS ALONE --- SESSIONS IN BANCROFT HOTEL

Plea Made for Happness Among Nations --- Reception Given by Local Believers -- Rev. Albert Vail of Chicago Makes Plea for Independent Investigation of Truth

An attack upon the theory of the superiority of the Nordic races marked the speech of Rev. Dr. John Herman Randall at the first public meeting at the Bahai congress in the Bancroft hotel last night. One hundred followers of the Bahai philosophy from all parts of the country convened Saturday night in this city. The congress will end tomorrow night.

Science has proven that humans of whatever races are equal." asserted Rev. Dr. Randall, who is pastor of the Community church of New York. “The scientists have examined the blood and even the body tissues of the various races and have been unable to find any difference that would Indicate superiority or inferiority."

The colored race, the clergyman contended, was in no way inferior to the white race, citing findings of the Russell Sage expedition, along the coast of Africa.

He deplored “petty religious and national prejudices,” but sald that a new spirit could be felt in the culture of today.

“Formerly,” he. said, “followers of one religion would say “There is only one way of find God and that is my way. Adherents to all the other religions will be condemned. Those who believe my way will leap beyond the stars."

But the new age has already begun to dawn and new chapters in the unfolding story of human life are being written. The old chapter is ending, but the new chapter begins immediately." In the Dark Ages, he said, the nation was supreme, with its citizens considered merely as the means of multiplying things and thereby producing profit and wealth.

That old philosophy, the speaker believed, was still in existence in the nationalism of some races and persons.

Instead of having widely varying peoples and cultures, the world, he said, was not only a great neighborhood, with the persons in one part of the neighborhood feeling, thinking and doing as the people of other parts of the world do to a large extent.

“The radio," declared Rey. Dr. Randall,” is one of the creations of science that is bringing the various peoples of various countries closer and closer in the great neighborhood of the world.”

He ended his lecture with:

“We desire but the good of the world and the happiness of the nations; yet they deem us a stirrer of strife and sedition worthy of bondage and punishments. That all nations should become one in faith and all men as brothers; that the bonds of affection and unity between the sons of men should be strengthened; that the diversity of religion should cease, and differences of race be annulled — what harm is there in this?

"Yet so it shall be; these fruitless strifes, these ruinous wars shall pass away, and the ‘Most Great Peace shall come."

(Reprint from the Worcester (Mass.) Daily Telegram, Apr. 28 '24.)

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Article Title: The advocate, May 24, 1924, Page 4, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 24, 1924

CHINA TODAY
By Martha Root

(Continued from last week)

(7) Universal Peace is one of the most vital issues among the educated classes of China today. They are eager to know about the Bahai movement, to learn its constructive program for a world peace. They say “We hope for a genuine and lasting internationalism--an internationalism that is based not on treaties and covenants which can be torn up; an internationalism which is based not on clever interpretations of carefully worded powers, but an interpretation based upon the unity of interest, unity of thought, unity of aims and hopes and unity of hearts. We students of China are ready. What will students of other nations do?" (This is something when one knows how enemies are encroaching upon Chinese sovereignty. They are not using blind hatred, but a faith that universal world brotherhood will eventually triumph.)

(8) Universal Education --- Dr. P. W. Kuo. president of Southeastern University, Nanking, was one of the leading advocates of universal education at the world conference on education, held in San Francisco in 1923. He said to the writer the other day: "The universal principles of Bahá'u'lláh will be favorably received in China. One of our deans has become so interested in universal education that he has been willing to give up his deanship to promote it. He is now the general secretary of the new national popular education movement of China."

(To be continued)

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Article Title: The advocate, August 09, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 9, 1924

SOCIETY NOTES

Kansas Matrons Royally Entertained

Two of the most widely feted visitors here this Summer were Mrs. P. M. Bell of Wichita. Kans, and her sister, Mrs. James H. Clayborn of Kansas City. Kansas, who arrived Wednesday night, July 30, from California (where they had spent a wonderful time) and remained a week [as] the house guests of Editor and Mrs E. D. Cannady. Both are charming young matrons, popular in club, fraternal, church and social circles in their respective homes. Thursday afternoon they dined at the Y. M. C. A. Thursday evening they were among the out-of-town guests at a reception given at the beautiful home of Mr. and Mrs Josef A Wisdom. 1512 Union Ave., North. Friday evening they attended a lecture at Central Building at which time George Orr Latimer gave a splendid recital of the activities of the Bahai Convention recently held in Worcester, Mass., which he attended in a representative capacity from the Assembly in Portland. At the close of the lecture, Mrs. Clara Anderson presided over a delicious Chinese supper served a la Chinese at a downtown Chinese Cafe. Saturday morning they were the guests of Mrs. Dora Gulliford at the Electronic Clinic of Dr. Chester and Dr. Mable Easter.

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Article Title: The advocate, August 16, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 16, 1924

[Most of this article was not shaded]

GEORGE ORR LATIMER, PROMINENT LOCAL MAN, DELIVERS IMPRESSIVE TALK BEFORE LARGE GATHERING -- SAYS RACES MUST RECOGNIZE ONENESS OF HUMANITY BEFORE PEACE IS ASSURED -- NO RACIAL SUPERIORITY.

----

- Race Prejudice Overcome Through Association and Good-fellowship -- Relates Experiences at Green Acre --- Excellent Record Made by Colored People.

(Special to The Advocate)

(Reported by Miss F. Swain)

(Last week we promised to publish the talk deliverd by George Orr Latimer, at the home of Editor and Mrs. E. D. Cannady, July 30, the occasion being a reception honoring Mesdames John E. Mapps of Washington and Alice Park of California.)

----------

About three years ago I as in a little Main community and some friend of mine who has the knack of traveling all over the world and speaking to everyone she meets trying to imbue them with the spirit of the new age, Miss Jack, met a colored gentleman one day at the market and told him he looked as if he were living in the new day, in the new springtime, and he asked her if she had anything he could read.

She said, "Yes, I will give you a booklet." And then he asked if she had anyone that could talk on these things and she said yes. So about 3 o'clock one Sunday afternoon, I was working in the garden of this place, and she came along and said I had a job talking that evening, and jokingly introduced me to this Reverend Harris as Deacon Lattimer, so when he introduced me to the congregation I apologized right away and when I finished he said, "It is evident that Mr. Latimer isn't any minister, but I will tell you what he is; a truth teller." I think a word or two about this place where I was would be of vital interest.

We have heard several talks about the troublesome times that we are facing. Personally, my viewpoint agrees with all of them, and I think that the underlying principle that is a solution for our present day problems, whether they be social, whether they be civic, economic, or religious lines --- that until the world, and that means the authorities of the world as well, recognize the principle of the oneness of the world of humanity; not until that recognition comes, will we begin to have a new era of civilization which will be a universal civilization. In fact, I think world peace which we are so anxious to see is a peace that is based upon the final unity of all races and peoples. The same thing works out in races. We cannot find a superior race on the face of the globe. Our leading naturalist in this country assures us that there is not a scintilla of evidence of the superiority as regards the civilizing effects of Nordic race, and that is our leading authority. We find the same thing to be true of religion. The same is true in our industrial and social crises. What seems to be much more acute here in the Western world also effects the Oriental world. They also have their oproblems and their solutions today depend greatly upon the solution of our problems.

This spirit of the oneness of religions had a great inception in this country in the first year of the first world's fair at Chicago. At that worlds fair there was a gathering of races and religions and it is interesting to note that the British government is holding a similar conference in London this year. Now you can see that every religion in the world is going to be represented and most of the races in the world will be represented in that conference and that is bound to make toward a greater understanding. In this conference held at the wold's fair, Miss Sara J. Farmer, one of the pioneers of the womens movement in this country, was there. She recieved that inspiration from that congress to carry on the ideal and the next year she established in this little town of Elliot Maine this center for the investigation of religions, which meant the reality of the religions, of science and philosophy, and the influences of the world that are of value.

I have been very much intersted in the work of gree Acre for the past six or seven years. The first year one of the great lights was there, Edward Everett Hale, and he has a very interesting story, I think. It shows the great spirit of that man --- shows how the trouble of meeting a certain issue that we have confronting us in the United States of America is easily overcome through association and good fellowship. The first time that Booker T. Washingotn arrived at Boston, he heard a voice behind him saying, "Let me help you." and when he looked around a hand was put down to help him, and this person who put down a helping hand was Edward Everret Hale. Booker T. Washington, I have found out also this summer, he had gone down and spoken at Green Acre conferences.

It has gone on all through these years and it is now entering on it's 31st season. These ideals have been held forth: the emancipation and freedom from the various shackles that are holding civilization back. It is no wonder such a movement has come into existence. The fact is that crumbling civilization, different aspects of the civilization of today, have left thinking humanity to work out its own pathways, so to see the clear horizon again. I think that in all relationships with the world that this great spirit of imbuing a spiritual understanding of the religions of the world outside of our own, a recognition of the equal rights of other races, and of all the sects in the world, and recognizing that science is in the world to devlop religion, to enlarge the vision of religion, and also to take in the scope of different capacities, that we have been created from the same divine power with the right to equal opportunity to develop our capacities. If we understand such things as that, then we have already entered into the new era. It is a question very often of education, environment, or one condition ed

[***AS PRINTED***]

a rather small and what is known as an aristocratic college in New England. This college has had very few students from the south, that is colored students, although when I was in college we didn't consider it aristocratic at all but considered there was a great deal of democratic spirit in the college. But in the graduating class the highest honors this year were given to a colored student, and the next highest honors were not given at all, and this colored student, perhaps the only one, was asked to give the oration by the class. Recently a contest was held to judge the poetry of the undergraduate world. The poems were submitteed without name and without distinction of color or sex. The first prize was given to a student of Columbia University. You can see by this that superiority, as we consider it in races, does not exist at all where the conditions are not known.

That is the little keynote of what they have found the Bahá'í spirit means to the world.

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Article Title: The advocate, September 13, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 13, 1924

Prominent Lecturer Here From New York City

Mr. and Mrs. Howard MacNutt and Mrs. Julia M. Grundy arrived in Portland Thursday for a series of Bahai lectures. They are on tour through the United States and will attend the Bahai convention to be held in San Francisco September 26. 27. 28.

Mrs. Grundy is the authoress of “Ten Days in the Light of Acea" and has traveled extensively in the interests of the Bahai movement.

Mr. MacNutt is the author of "Unity Through Love" and the compiler of the two volumes of Abdul Bsha’s American Addresses known as "The Promulgation of Universal Peace." He entertained Abdul Baha during his visit to America in 1912 and was instrumental in obtaining voice records and moving pictures of the famous prophet from Persia.

Mr MacNutt was one of the speakers at the First Amity Congress held in Washington, D. C. for the purpose of Creating a better understanding between the races.

They will speak at the following public places during their visit to Portland.

Friday evening, 8 o'clock, at Bahai assembly, room 212 Central building.

Saturday evening. 8 o’clock, with Portland branch library, 190 Killingsworth; "World Unity and Its Accomplishment.”

Sunday morning, 11 o'clock, at First Divine Science church, East 25th and Clay streets; subject, "The New Era."

Sunday evening, 8 o'clock, at Bethel A. M. E. church, corner Larrabee and McMillen streets.

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Article Title: The advocate, September 20, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 20, 1924

Noted Bahaist Speaks at Bethel

Howard McNutt, of New York City, author and lecturer of note, delivered a wonderful speech at Bethel A. M. E. Church last Sunday night. The full text of his speech has been sent in for publication too late for this issue. Watch next week’s Advocate for it.

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Article Title: The advocate, September 27, 1924, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 27, 1924

New York Man Prominent In Bahai Movement Addresses Representative Audience at Bethel.

On last Sunday night at Bethel A. M. E. Church, Howard MacNutt, prominent Bahai lecturer, author and philosopher, gave a most illuminating address on the Bahai religion to a representative audience.

Mr. MacNutt was introduced by George Orr Latimer, leader in the work locally, and who is loved by all races in the city. Mr. MacNutt stressed the point of rightful reconciliation in religious views instead of trying to force one view as against the other. Mr. MacNutt said: "When argument creeps in, the Word of God and the Spirit of God goes out." He said the special point the Bahai Revelation is teaching all over the world is the point of reconciliation between man and man, and that the purpose of God in all the holy books of whatever religious teaching, is ultimately to bring man together in peace, and brotherhood, in the knowledge and love of God.

Mr. MacNutt's address was replete with rich metaphors. Many proclaimed Mr. MacNutt's explanation of the Bahai movement more clarifying than any they had previously heard.

Miss Grundy, who accompanied Mr. and Mrs. McNutt here, sang Burleigh's "Deep River” and "Nobody Knows the Trouble I've Seen," accompanied by Mr. MacNutt.

The MacNutt party motored from New York here and thence to San Francisco, Cal., to attend the Amity Convention of the Bahai movement.

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Article Title: The advocate, December 13, 1924, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Dec. 13, 1924

Association Doing Effective Work

The Portland Branch of the N. A. A. C. P. continues to hold regular, earnest, meetings at which time members are added to the roll. This organization bids fair to excel any other in the city among the Race. At the last meeting held, 21 members were enrolled for the ensuing year. Some were renewals, however, but there is an ever increasing number of new members.

Jinab-I-Fadil, a great Persian philosopher and lecturer who will be in the city during the month of January under the auspices of the Bahai Center, will speak for the Association at its regular meeting the second Monday night in January, being the 12th. His subject will be “Conquest of Prejudice." Dr. Fadil is rated as one of the deepest thinkers of the age, and he was among those named by Abdul Baha before his ascension, upon whom the mantel of teacher would fall. Plans are being made by the Association to make this the biggest event of the year in the Association. The drive for new members continues indefinitely.

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Article Title: The advocate, January 03, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 3, 1925

Bahais Get Together

For the pleasure of meeting Jinab-I-Fadil and his interesting wife and children, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer entertained a few friends at their home in Rose City Park on the evening of January 1st.

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Article Title: The advocate, January 03, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 3, 1925

Jinab-I-Fadil

Portland will be honored the month of January by having in its presence Jinab-I-Fadil, great Persian philosopher and leader in the Bahai cause. Dr. Fadil is considered by many the greatest living expounder of Brotherhood of man. He has closely contacted the great Abdul Baha before he passed more than a year ago. The Portland Branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People feel greatly honored to have him as their guest and speaker during his sojourn in the city. Dr. Fadil has eighty-three subjects from which he will speak during his month’s visit here and so interesting are they all that it is hard to choose one among the many. Dr. Fadil is said to be one of the greatest philosophers of the age and among the most learned. As an indication of his democracy he has mastered the English language so that he does not have an interpreter as he had several years ago when he visited Portland. It is to be hoped that our people and as many others as wish to, will fill the places upon every occasion where Dr. Fadil will speak while here. All his lectures are free.

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Article Title: The advocate, January 17, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 17, 1925

N.A.C.C.P. Has Excellent Program

At its meeting Monday evening at First A. M. E. Zion church, the Portland branch of the National Aasociation for the Advancement of Colored People had a fine program featuring Jinab-I-Fadil, Persian philosopher, and teacher of the Bahai Movement.

Dr. Fadil discussed the "Conquest of Prejudice" in a vivid, simple and quite understandable way. Dr. Fadil was introduced by George Orr Latimer, leader in the local Bahai Movement. Miss Shaw sang sweetly, Mrs. Jessie Edwards played excellently and the President, J. A. Ewing, and Corresponding Secretary of the organization, Mrs. E. D. Cannady made brief talks. At the close of the program an informal reception was held downstairs and everyone enjoyed the entire affair. The church was completely filled for the occasion and on every side one could hear words of praise of Dr. Fadil's talk.

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Article Title: The advocate, January 17, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Jan. 17, 1925

Williams Avenue Y.W.C.A.

The Bible Class is growing in interest and in numbers.

The annual meeting and membership banquet was attended by 20 branch members and guests and two High School Reserves.

The High School Reserves will hold their Social Hour on Sunday at 4 P.M. A program will be rendered.

The Girls' Work Committee has planned a progressive dinner for January the 20th.

Due to lack of interest the swimming classes have been discontinued until further notice.

Mrs. K. Gray announces a membership party for January the 23rd, when all members, former members and prospective members and all interested in the work are invited to be present.

All members in good standing have been mailed ballots for the election of officers January 28th.

Jinab-l-Fadil, the Persian philosopher, was the interesting speaker at the branch on Friday afternoon to a small but appreciative group. Mr. George Latimer of the Portland Bahá'í Assembly introduced the speaker.

Mrs, Alta L. Stevens, Oregon Social Hygeine Staff, will begin a series of lectures to mothers at the branch on Tuesday, January the 20th, at 4 P. M , under the auspices of the Mothers' Club. The lectures are free and are open to adults only.

The Blue Triangle Club will meet Friday the l6th at 8 P. M.

The women interested in reading are invited to meet at the Y. W. C. A., Friday at 2, January the 16th. to organize a club.

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Article Title: The advocate, February 21, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Feb. 21, 1925

Dies From Burns

Mr. Hougen of Seattle, Wa., sustained injuries by burning February 13 when an oil furnace exploded in his home, which resulted in his death Monday evening. Mr. Hougen was a leader in Bahai circles in Seattle and had a host of friends both in Portland

and his home city, who mourn his untimely and tragic end. Members from the Bahai center in Portland motored over Tuesday to attend the funeral.

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Article Title: The advocate, April 04, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 4, 1925

Those Interested in Living in Brotherly Love Invited
Portland Ore., April 2, 1925.

Dear Mrs Cannady:

May I ask you to aextend to your readers an invitation to join a discussion group known as A Fellowship for a Better Social Order? Our next meeting is at the Y.M.C.A. on Saturday April 25, at 12:15 noon, and we shall appreciate your inviting any whom you think would be interested in trying to find out how better to get along with each other.

Your recent address on the "Peace Problems of Portland" before the Fellowship was greatly appreciated and I believe will be productive of much good and will help us all to learn that no matter what the pigment of our swkins we are all “just folks."

Our Fellowship is a sort of spontaneous growth and at a recent meeting we had Bahaists, Roman Catholics, Protestants, preachers, teachers, lawyers, a letter carrier, housewives, merchants, editors.

We are trying to learn how to live on the same street, in the same town, in the same country and in the same world without mussing up the place where we live with all sorts of fights and anyone you know whom you think would help in such discussion I wish you would invite. As the size of the room is limited, we shall appreciate it if any of your readers who plan to come will make reservations through your office.

Cordially yours,
J. J. HANDSAKER.

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Article Title: The advocate, May 02, 1925, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 2, 1925

The Bahai Movement in America is one of the greatest agencies of peace and good-will amongst men of all races and colors. Long may the movement live and spread.

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Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 20, 1925

Moslem Fanatics Slay Persian Bahais

Outbreak of Atrocities, Similar to Those by Which Major Imbrie Was Murdered, Reported to Local Bahai Aasembly

That mob violence, instigatcd by Mohammedan clergy, has become prevalent in many parts of Persia, causing acts of fanatical violence even more atrocious in method than the assination of Major Robert W Imbrie, American Vice-Consul in Teheran, last summer, is reported to the Bahá'ís of Portland in letters from the Near East, received by Mr. J. W. Latimer, local secretary. Major Imbrie, it has been testified by Americans in the city at the time of the murder, was put to death because of his courageous protection of American Bahai teachers stationed in Teheran.

These reports, based upon direct communication with Bahai assemblies throughout Persia, declare it is evident that the fresh outrages are part of deliberate attempt to subject the Bahais of that country to wholesale persecution without parallel in civilized countries during modern times.

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Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 27, 1925

Prosecution Continues Against Bahaists

Detailed instances of the persecution of Bahaists have been received here by Secretary of the Bahai Group in Portland, Mr, J. W. Latimer from the Near East. One report reads:

"In the village of Qamsar, near Teheran, a Persian named Aqa Rida, a recent convert, who had refused to recant his faith, was thrown into the river by a mob headed by Aqa Ahmad, son of a local Mullah, and afterward tied to a tree and most cruelly beaten. Still steadfast in his faith, the unfortunate man was afterward dragged through the streets of Qamsar and publicly tortured"

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Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 26, 1925

WELL WISHERS FINE SUCCESS

The program given by the well-wishers of First A. M. F. Zion church Thursday night, over which Mrs. Dora Gulliford presided, was a complete success The program was an elaborate one and found an artistic setting on a stage beautifully decorated in autumn flowers. The out-of-town participants were Mrs. Luther of Seattle who talked on the Bahai revelation, and Edward C. Morgan who charmed his audience with several selections on his exquisite gold saxaphone.

Fraternalisim was represeted by Talks and funds, led by O.S Thomas. Mrs Gulliford received deserved praise for the staging of such a splendid program for the benefit of the Master's Cause.

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Article Title: The advocate, October 10, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Oct. 10, 1925

MRS. IDA FINCH ADDRESSES WOMENS CLUB

The Portland Womans Mutual Benefit Club met Saturday evening at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Lomax, 1019 East 27th Street North. Nineteen ladies were present and Mrs. Idah Brown, the president of the club, presided. Miss Faye Swain and Mesdames M. D. Campbell and E. D. Cannady furnished the music. Favourite quotations were given by each one. Mrs. Idah Finch, discussed the Bahai principles and also told of the recent earthquake in Japan, and how she miraculously escaped.

The hostess, assisted by Mme. Thibodeaux-Veisell, served dainty refreshments.

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Article Title: The advocate, October 17, 1925, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Oct. 17, 1925

BAHAI ASSEMBLY SCENE OF INTERESTING LECTURE FRI.

On last Friday evening at the Bahai Assembly in the Central Building on Tenth Street, Mrs. Ida Finch who is here from Seattle, and who taught English to the Japanese for five yrs., gave a most interesting travelogue, "AN EVENING IN JAPAN" to a large and appreciative group.

Mrs Mabel Cooper, sang a group of songs in her usual fascinating way. Miss Barbara Hubbard played her accompaniments on the piano.

Refreshemtns consisting of several kinds of Japanese cakes, were dispensed.

On October the 23rd, George Orr Latimer will deliver the address and his subject is, "The Bane of Prejudice". Every one is welcome.

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Article Title: The advocate, February 13, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Feb. 13, 1926

SIOUX INDIAN SPEAKS

Albert T. Freeman a Sioux Indian who has been lecturing for various audiences lately, spoke Friday night before the Bahai Assemblage at room 212 Central Bldg. Tenth and Alder Streets. The meeting was open to the public.

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Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 6, 1926

The Associate Editor of The Advocate will deliver two addresses at the Williamette University, Salem. Ore., on Tuesday, March 9. At the University Chapel before the Fellowship of Reconciliation at dinner at 6 p. m. On Friday March 12th she will speak before the Bahai Assembly, 2nd floor Central Bldg , and on Sunday, March 14, Mrs. Cannady will deliver the eleven o'clock message to from 150 to 200 young people at the Pioneer (white) Methodist church, St. Johns. On a date later in the month, she will be the speaker before a group of club women in Laurelhurst. Other invitations cover several states which Mrs. Cannadv will try and arrange to accept.

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Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 20, 1926

Mrs. E. D. Cannady addressed the Bahai Assembly in the Central Bld. at its regular meeting on last Friday evening, using for her subject, the N. A. A. C. P. She also delivered the Sunday message to the junior Pioneer Methodist church in St. Johns last Sunday morning and was well received at both places.

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Article Title: The advocate, March 27, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: March 27, 1926

The Bahai group observed their New Year Feast at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Lattimer in Rose City Park Sunday evening. Among those who had a few words to say were Mrs. Dora Gulhford, Miss Margie Danley and Mr. Presley Holliday. Mrs. E. D. Cannady sang a group of Negro Spirituals.

At the close of the spiritual feast a material feast in the form of good things to eat was enjoyed.

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Article Title: The advocate, April 03, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: April 3, 1926

The Bahai Assembly, at the request of Mrs. E. D. Cannady at the close of her address delivered before that body at the Central Bldg, on Friday two weeks ago, sent telegrams to Senators McNary and Stanfield requesting them to support the Dyer-Mckinley Anti-lynching Bill. The following replies were received from the Senators:

“Washington. D. C. Mar 29, 1926.

Portland Bahai Assembly, Portland, Oregon.

Sympathies are with the colored people who have made such remarkable progress since emancipation. Will give sympathetic consideration all legislation along line Dyer-McKinley bill. (Signed) Robert N Stanfield. U. S. Senator.

Washington. D. C. Mar 29. 1926

Portland Bahai Assembly, Portland, Oregon.

Will give my support to passage Dryer McKinley anti lynching bill.

Thank you for telegram.

(signed) Chas McNary.

Mrs. Canady spoke in the interest of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People.

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Article Title: The advocate, May 22, 1926, Image 6
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: May 22, 1926

GOOD WILL DAY OBSERVED HERE

MANY NATIONALITIES REPRESENTED AT GATHERING AT E. D. CANNADY HOME.

(Reprinted from the Portland Telegram of May 18. 1926)

Interesting observance of International Good Will day held Sunday afternoon at the home of Mr and Mrs. E. D. Cannady, 520 E 26th Street N.

Those attending included 50 Americans, English, Spanish, Japanese, Chinese and American Negroes. Various religious faiths were represented including Jewish, Bahaist, Roman Catholic and Protestant.

George Orr Latimer introduced the honor guest of the afternoon, Mrs Elirabeth Greenleaf of Chicago and Montreal. Mrs. Greenleaf is en route home from attending the Bahai convention.

Other speakers were Ken Nakazawa, the Rev Harrold Griffis, Mrs J. J. Handsaker, Mrs. Nathan Harris, Mrs. W. F. Smith, Mrs. Stanley Chin, and W. C. Holliday.

Piano numbers were given by Mrs Frank Holcomb and vocal numbers by Mrs. E. D. Cannady. Mrs I. E. Johnson and Miss Violet Hooker, with Mrs Jessie Edwards accompanying. Readings were given by Mrs. Greenleaf and Miss Gwendolyn Hooker.

The tea table, with lavender color scheme, was presided over by Mesdams L. K. Poyntz, M.D. Campbell, Clara Bell and Miss Ruth Hing.


NEW YORKER TO VISIT

Mr. Horace Holley of New York City, well known author and philosoppher, a lecturer of international fame will spend a few days in Portland next week. Mr Holley has been in San Francisco, Cal, where he attended the 18th Annual Bahai Convention at the Hotels Whitcomb and Palace.

Mr. Holley is a graduate of Williams College and has spent some time in Europe in research work. He is a brilliant speaker, highly intellectual and spiritual and if present plans materialize, he will deliver the evening message at Bethel A. M. E. church next Sunday evening, May 23.


Mr. Louis Gregory who is to address several gatherings in the city during next week is a native of Washington, D. C. where for some time he was in the practice of law, and also employed by the United States Government for several years.

For a number of years he has been in the lecture field working in the interest of the establishment of a universal Brotherhood; better understanding between races and nations.

Mr. Gregory has spoken in all the large Eastern and Southern cities last week. [THIS IS IN THE ARTICLE BUT APPEARS TO BE A MISS PRINT> In the Charleston contest <] Recently he has attended a Bahai Convention held in San Fracisco, Cal. and has spoken before large audiences in Los Angeles and Pasadena. He is en route East and is stopping in Portland for a few days on this trip.

Mr Gregory will speak Sunday evening at the First Christian church, and on Sunday evening May the 30, he will speak before the Centenary-Wilber M. E. congregation.

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Publication Date: May 29, 1926


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MAY 29, 1926 FRONT PAGE ARTICLE

NATIONAL BAHA'I CONVENTION REVIEWED

DISTINGUISHED MEN AND WOMEN FROM ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA MEET IN GREAT CONVENTION IN SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA

Oneness of Mankind, Foundation of all Religions is One Reality and Many Other Great Universal Principles Stressed, Several Racial Groups and More Than One Religious Belief Represented Among Speakers on Programs.

COMPLETE HARMONY MARKED ALL SESSIONS

Special to The Advocate
(By Louis Gregory)

An event of transcendent importance to America, as well as to all races and nations of the world, is the annual convention of the Bahá'ís of the United States and Canada, recently held in the city of San Francisco and bringing together hundreds of delegates and visiting friends from many cities, and representing various schools of thought, divers races, religions and nationalities, all of whom have found reconciliation and peace and have worked out a happy mode of living through the Bahá'í teachings. These inspired writings present to the world a peace-brotherhood program by which all human elements can advance to the ideal goal of happiness. They apply religion in a practical form to the needs af humanity They simplify those ideals of rectitude which all men should pursue, Already they have proved their spiritual illumination and power by training a great throng of progressive souls. East and West, North and South, to abandon the lower wor!d of hatred, prejudice and rancor and to ascend into the higher zones of love, appreciation and life.

Among the foremost of these teachings are the following universal principles, as compiled from the words of Abdu'l Baha:

    1, The onness of mankind,
    2. The independent investigation of Truth.
    3. The foundation of all religions is one Reality.
    4. Religion must be the cause of unity.
    5. Religion must be in accord with science and reason.
    6, Equality between men and women.
    7. Prejudice of all kinds must be forgotten,
    8. Universal peace.
    9. Universal education.
    10. Solution of the economic problem.
    11. A universal language.
    12. The power of the Holy Spirit.

Portland sent to San Franisco a fine delegation representing the local assembly of Bahá'í's. Among these were Miss Ella Meissner, who made an interesting address at one of the sessions on the work among those of tender years, Mr. Geo. O. Latimer, who presided at one of the sessions, Mrs. E. D. Cannady who in an address which was reatly appreciated, presented the greeting of the National Association for the Advancemtent of Colored People and decribed some of the difficulties of life among colored Ameericans. Dr. Freedman, an American Indian who is well educated, was also among the notable speakers. He entertained the audience with a recital of Indian customs, told of their high moral standards, sang Indian lullabys, and made an eloquent plea for greater consideration and justice on the part of the American people to people of his race.

The business sessions of the convention, although not open to the public, yet drew a greeat number of interested inquirers. The way that people can conduct their afairs when influenced and bound together by a spiritual tie was a model worthy of study. Mr. Roy C. Wilhelm, a Wall street broker from the East was elected president. As chairmen usually go he was quite unconvenional, but kept all in a state of happiness by his bright and genial humor, using his place to demonstrate the teachings in action. He was ably assisted by Mr. Horace Holley, the secretary, a distinguished author and former business man of New York. He now occupies the position of secretary of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís

of America and Canada. A large volume of business was dispatched in an incredible short time. The convention was kept in motion and had (Continued on page four)


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Publication Date: May 29, 1926

National Bahai Convention

(Continued from page one)

no dull moments.

An interesting feature was the number of messages and greetings that came from many American and foreign cities. Another was the report of the progress of the work of teaching and guiding souls in all parts of the world to the path of true freedom and light. The joyfulness and harmony had a deep and far-reaching signifcance. A love was expressed that was all-embracing that gave clarity of vision and bound the hearts together.

The two public meetings for teaching, that is, making points of contact with the great public, were the Banquet of El Ridvan and the open meeting held in the ball room of the Palace, one of the largest hotels of that cosmopolitan city. The former assembled more than three hundred at the tables which were all beautifully adorned with flowers and favors, The latter filled the hall to overflowing. In both these luminus gatherings colored Americans were liberally repesented, both among the speakers and the auditors. Music of the most entertaining kind added to the joyousness of both occasions. The presence of white and colored Americans, Chinese and Japanese, all in most kindly spirit, lent a picturesque charm to the meetings. Mr. LeRoy Ioas, a young business man, presided at this Ridvan Feast and Mrs. Ella G. Cooper, in sounding a note of welcome to the brilliant gathering said; “Forgive us if we are a little hilarious tonight. Such meetings intoxicate us with the wine of love of God. They are significant of a closer unity among all mankind with happiness as the keynote. The announcement of Bahá'u'lláh, which this gathering commemorates, carried a wave of happiness all over the world."

Among other speakers were Mrs. May Maxwell and Mrs. Elizabeth Greenleaf of Montreal, Mr. Albert Vail and Mrs, Corinne True of Chicago, Mrs. Stewart W. French of Pasadena, Torao Kawasaki, the Japanese Consul, Shinji Yamasoto, a boy, and Louis G. Gregory, a colored lecturer from Washingon, D. C., who spoke on Baha’i courage.”

Great success attended the public meeting for the teaching and spread of the Baha’i ideals and principles of broherhood. Mr, Horace Holley presided and with fine power of expression and radiant heart made a point of contact for each of the four speakers. Mrs, Greenleaf, told of her recent pilgrimage to the Holy Land and of meeting the brilliant youth, Shoghi Effendi, who is now the Guardian of the Bahá'í Cause. Mrs, May Maxwell traced the history of the movement, starting vith the Bab, the herald of the new day of peace, and then telling of the exalted life and services to the world of Bahá'u'lláh, the great founder of the movement, who though imprisoned and exiled and meeting the most intense opposition, yet succeded in waving the banner of victory over the East and West and of drawing together the peoples of every race and religion, and of Abbu'l Baha, his son and successor, who shared his father’s exile and imprisonment, but after his release traveled far and wide disseminating the Bahá'í ideals, visiting America in 1912 and shedding a wonderful light upon public events.

Louis G Gregory spoke on the Bahá'í ideal of cooperation and the oneness of humanity, demonstrating its practical bearing upon American life and its application to all races. Mr, Albert R. Vail as the last speaker gave a very eloquent address on the unity of all religions and the power of the Word of God. It now appears that all faiths should investigate the Bahá'í Movement, which without abrogating anything that is valid and vital in any religion, yet reveals the means of peace and harmony for all. To the earnest seeker a new spiritual consciousness is discernable and in fulfillment of the promises of Christ and a new day of peace and righteousness has truly dawned for the whole world.

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Article Title: The advocate, June 05, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 5, 1926

TWELVE RACES REPRESENTED AT AFTERNOON TEA

Reprinted from the Daily Journal of May 31, 1926, Portland. Oregon.

Nearly 100 persons, representing at least a dozen different nationalities, attended the inter-racial, international and interreligious tea given Sunday afternoon from 2;30 to 5:30 o'clock by Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Cannady at their home No. 520 Fast 26th Street north.

The special guests were Louis Gregory, traveler and lecturer, of Washington. D. C., and William Pickens, of New York, field secretary of the National Association for Advancement of Colored People.

This is one of a series of teas given frequently on Sunday afternoons at the Cannady residence, at least six having been held during the present year. The purpose is to bring about a better understanding between races and religious elements, as a part of the general movement to establish world peace.

The afternoon's program included talks by both the guests of honor, Albert R. Vail of Chicago and Mrs. Mae Maxwell of Montreal, Rev. John F. Moreland, pastor of Zion A. M. E. Churoh; Mrs Nathan Harrir, George P. Eisman of the city school board; Mrs, J. J.Handsaker, and Professor Sell of the chair of Sociology, Reed college; and the Rev. Uemeura of the Japanese Methodist mission.

M. R. Siato, Japanese, gave selections on the Japanese native flute, and was introduced by Ken Nakazawa Japanese poet. Piano selections were given by Miss Nellie Franklin and Mrs. Jessie Edwards; Mrs F. M Jasper sang a group of Swiss songs; Mr. R. Ahn, Korean, sang “The Holy City" in his native tongue, and Professor Woodfin gave a piano selection he had composed for this special event. All of the singers were accompanied by Mrs. Oliver Wickersham.

The nationalities or races represented at this unique tea included: Negro, Japanese, Chinese, Korean, German, Swiss, French, Spanish, Assyrian, Armenian. Greek, and American. The religions represented were the Hebrew, Bahai, Roman Catholic, and various branches of the Protestant churches.


NOTED TEACHER AND AUTHOR HAS BUSY STAY IN THE CITY

Noted among visitors in Portlad this week was Dr. Albert R. Vail of Chicago Ill.

Dr. Vail arrived in the city Sunday morning from San Francisco, California where he remained for two weeks after the close of the 18th Annual Convention of the Bahai's of the United States and Canada, held in that city, recently.

Dr. Vail spoke at the Metaphysical Library. 507 Yamill Street, at Mrs Chloe's Sunday moring convocation at 11 o'clock upon "The Pathway to Spritual Realization and Universal Love." In the afternoon, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Cannady in livington, Dr Vail was one of the four special guests. Here he spoke upon the subject, “The New Path to Religious Unity". On Sunday evening be spoke at the Congregational Church upon "The Oneness of Mankind."

Monday evening Dr. Vail gave an address at Newberg, Oregon in Paciic College Auditorium upon "The Oneness of Mankind and Some Universal Paths to Universal Peace.” He spoke of the Bahá'í program presented 60 years ago by Baha'U'llah from his prison in Acca inviting the nations to call a Universal Conference; for the establishment of an International Court of arbitral justice; for the simultaneous limitation of armaments and the establishment of the principles of universal arbitration. He suggested also that this world court consider a universal language to be taught in all the schools of the world as an aid to the Universal Peace. He laid down the following principles: Universal campaign of education in arts, sciences and the oneness of mankind, the harmonizing of science and religion, the establishment of perfect equality between men and women; close co-operation between capital and labor and the recognition of the underlying unity of all existing faiths.

Tuedsay he spoke at the Metaphysical Library, Upon "The City of Immortality and the Gate Thereunto", at the close of which Dr. Vail was rushed to the Portland hotel where he broadcasted from station KOIN, on the subject of “World Organization of the Most Great Peace."

Wednesday evening he spoke at the press club meeting at the home of Dr. H. E. Ingham, 1181 Harold Avenue upon Bahá'í principles for World Peace. Thursday evening he gave a lecture at the Metaphysical Library under the auspices of the Bahá'í Assembly upon "The Most Successful Persons in Human History." He showed that the most influential, powerful and beneficient rulers have been, not it's kings and its generals, but its great prophets, for they have swayed, guided, educated and united the lives of untold millions of people. The dominion of Napoleon lasted for two decades, while the dominion of Christ, for nineteen centuries. The Kings and rulers of India rise and fall and are forgotten but the Buddha illumines and purifies and upholds the lives of perhaps a third of the human race for twenty five centuries. Mongol Dynasties rise and fall and are no more, but Confucius sits upon an everlasting throne "the uncrowned King of ten thousand kingdoms." He then showed how this same kiind of prohetic influence is rising with its purifying; its illuminating power in the great Bahá'í teachers, Bahá'u'lláh and Abdu'l Baha and through them the Holy spirit has united a great multitude of Christinas Jews, Mohammedians, Buddhists, Confucionists and the members of all races, into a great spiritual brotherhood that already goes around the world. And thus these great Bahá'í Educators are training a great multitude in the life of Universal Love, transforming them from soldiers of earth to soldiers of the Prince of Peace.

Friday evening he addressed the Committee for a Better Social Order at the Y. M. C. A. Annex at 6:15 upon “The Greatest Religions Discovery of Modern Times.” At 8:15 he gave his final address in Portland at the Metaphsyical Library, under the auspices of the Bahá'í Assembly, speaking "The Truth Which Will Set The Whole World Free." “It is the truth" he said, “of the oneness of all nations and races; of the fundamental oneness of religions and the need of a universal society of nations; it is the truth of universal brotherhood and universal love as it is taught and made manifest by the great prophet who not only proclaims the truth but in his life, is the truth.”

Each afternoon during his stay in Portland, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer, 379 E. 38th St. North, Dr. Vail conducted a class in methods of spiritual teaching. A multiplicity of engagement in the city prevented Dr. Vail from filling an engagement for him to address Prof. Langlin's Sociology classes at Willamette University, Salem, Oregon on Wednesday. A trip over the Columbia River Highway; to Reed College and several dinner engagements completed Dr. Vail's busy stay in Portland, and he stated before leaving the city Friday night for Seattle, that Portland and surrounding districts are the most beautiful that he has ever seen during his world travels.

Dr. Vail recieved his A. B. degree from the Univ. of Chicago; his Doctor of Divinity from Harvard. For 12 years he pastored a church at the University of Illinois. He is an author and contributor of articles to various magazines.

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Article Title: The advocate, June 05, 1926, Image 2
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 5, 1926

DISTINGUISHED MEN AND WOMEN FROM ALL PARTS OF THE UNITED STATES AND CANADA MEET IN GREAT CONVENTION IN SAN FRANCISCO CALIFORNIA

Oneness of mankind, Foundation of all Religions is One Reality and Many Other Great Universal Principles Stressed. Several Racial Groups and More Than One Religious Belief Represented Among Speakers on Programs.

COMPLETE HARMONY MARKED ALL SESSIONS

Special to The Advocate
(By Louis of Gregory)

An event of transcendent importance to America, as well as to all races and nations of the world, is the annual convention of the Baha’is of the United States and Canada, recently held in the city of San Francisco and bringing together hundreds of delegates and visiting friends from many cities, and representing various schools of thought, divers races, religions and nationalities, all of whom have found reconciliation and peace and have worked out a happy mode of living through the Baha’i teachings. These inspired writings present to the world a peace-brotherhood program by which all human elements can advance to the ideal goal of happiness. They apply religion in a practical form to the needs af humanity. They simplify those ideals of rectitude which all men should pursue. Already they have proved their spiritual illumination and power by training a great throng of progressive souls, East and West, North and South, to abandon the lower world of hatred, prejudice and rancor and to ascend into thé higher zones of love, appreciation and life.

Among the foremost of these teachings are the following universal principles, as compiled from the words of Abdu'l Baha:

    1. The onness of mankind.
    2. The independent investigation of Truth.
    3. The foundation of all religions is one Reality.
    4. Religion must be the cause of unity.
    5. Religion must be in accord with science and reason.
    6. Equality between men and women.
    7. Prejudice of all kinds must be forgotten.
    8. Universal peace.
    9. Universal education.
    10. Solution of the economic problem.
    11. A universal language.
    12. The power of the Holy Spirit.

Portland sent to San Francisco a fine delegation representing the local assembly of Baha’is. Among these were Miss Ella Meissner, who made an interesting address at one of the sessions on the work among those of tender years, Mr. Geo. O. Latimer, who presided at one of the sessions, Mrs. E. D. Cannady who in an address which was greatly appreciated, presented the greeting of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and described some of the difficulties of life among colored Americans. Mr. Freeman, an American Indian who is well educated, was also among the notable speakers. He entertained the audience with a recital of Indian customs, told of their high moral standards, sang Indian lulabys, and made an eloquent plea for greater consideration and justice on the part of the American people to people of his race.

The business sessions of the convention, although not open to the public, yet drew a great number of interested inquirers. The way that people can conduct their affairs when influenced and bound together by a spiritual tie was a model worthy of study. Mr. Roy C. Wilhelm, a Wall street broker from the East was elected president. As chairmen usually go he was quite unconventional, but kept all in a state of happiness by his bright wit and genial humor, using his place to demonstrate the Baha’i teachings in action. He was ably assisted by Mr. Horace Holly, the secretary, a distinguished author and formerly a businessman of New York. He now occupies the position of secretary of the National Spiritual Assembly of the Baha’is of America and Canada. A large volume of business was dispatched in an incredibly short time. The convention was kept in motion and had no dull moments.

An interesting feature was the number of messages and greetings that came from many American and foreign cities. Another was the report of the progress of the work of teaching and guiding souls in all parts of the world to the path of true freedom and light. The joyfulness and harmony had a deep and far-reaching significence. A love was expressed that was all-embracing, that gave clarity of vision and bound the hearts together.

The two public meetings for teaching, that is, making points of contact with the great public, were the Banquet of El Ridvan and the open meeting held in the ball room of the Palace, one of the largest hotels of that cosmopolitan city. The former assembled more than three hundred at the tables which were all beautifully adorned with flowers and favors. The latter filled the hall to overflowing. In both these luminous gatherings colored Americans were liberally represented, both among the speakers and the auditors. Music of the most entertaining kind added to the joyousness of both occasions. The presence of white and colored Americans, Chinese and Japanese, all in most kindly spirit, lent a picturesque charm to the meetings. Mr. LeRoy Ioas, a young business man, presided at the Ridvan Feast and Mrs. Ella G. Cooper, in sounding a note of welcome to the brilliant gathering said: “Forgive us if we are a little hilarious tonight. Such meetings intoxicate us with the wine of love of God. They are significant of a closer unity among all mankind, with happiness as the key note. The announcement of Baha'u’llah, which this gathering commemorates, carried a wave of happiness all over the world.”

Among other speakers were Mrs. May Maxwell and Mrs. Elizabeth Greenleaf of Montreal, Mr. Albert Vail and Mrs. Corinne True of Chicago, Mrs. Stewart W. French of Pasadena, Torao Kawasaki, the Japanese Consul, Shinji Yamasoto, a boy, and Louis G. Gregory, a colored lecturer from Washington. D. C., who spoke on Baha’i courage.

Great success attended the public meeting for the teaching and spread of the Baha’i ideals and principles of brotherhood. Mr. Horace Holley presided and with fine power of expression and radiant heart made a point of contact for each of the four speakers. Mrs. Elizabeth Greenleaf, told of her recent pilgrimage to the Holy Land and of meeting the brilliant youth, Shoghi Effendi, who is now the Guardian of the Baha’i Cause. Mrs. May Maxwell traced the history of the movement, starting with the Bab, the herald of the new day of peace, and then telling of the exalted life and services to the world of Baha’u’llah, the great founder of the movement, who though imprisoned and exiled and meeting the most intense opposition, yet suc

(Continued on page four)

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Publication Date: June 5, 1926

National Bahai Convention

(Continued from Page Two)

ceded in waving the banner of victory over the East and West and of drawing together peoples of every race and religion, and of Abdu’l Baha, his son and successor, who shared his father’s exile and imprisonment, but after his release traveled far and wide in disseminating the Baha’i ideals, visiting America in 1912 and shedding a wonderful light upon public events.

Louis G. Gregory spoke on the Bahá'í ideal of cooperation and the oneness of humanity, demonstrating its practical bearing upon American life and its application to all races. Mr. Albert R. Vail as the last speaker gave a very eloquent address on the unity of all religions and the power of the Word of God. It now appears that all faiths should investigate the Baha’i Movement, which without abrogating anything that is valid and vital in any religion, yet reveals the means of peace and harmony for all. To the earnest seeker a new spiritual consciousness is discernable and in fulfillment of the promises of Christ a new day of peace and righteousness has truly dawned for the whole world.

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Article Title: The advocate, June 12, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: June 12, 1926

Mr. Louis G. Gregory of Washington. D. C. who has been in Seattle the past ten days where he went from Portland, returned to the city Thursday morning and is domiciled at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer in Rose City Park. Thursday morning at 11 o'clock Mr. Gregory and the associate editor of The Advocate addressed senior classes in history at Lincoln High School. In the afternoon, Mr. Gregory spoke to a group at Mt. Olivet Baptist church. He was the dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Cannady in the evening and at night he spoke to a small group at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer. Friday evening he spoke before the Bahai Assembly at 405 Yamhill St., and on Saturday afternoon he left for a visit to Denver, Colo.

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Article Title: The advocate, July 24, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: July 24, 1926

O God! Make all my ideals and thoughts one ideal and one thought, and suffer me to attain an eternal, unchangeable condition in Thy service. --- ‘Abdu’l-Baha.

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Article Title: The advocate, August 21, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 21, 1926

Mrs. Ida M. Finch of Seattle, Wa., is visiting Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Latimer, at their residence in Rose City Park. She spoke at the Bahai Center Friday evening.

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Article Title: The advocate, August 21, 1926, Image 4
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Aug. 21, 1926

Meekness and humility are the hall marks of faith. As soon as a person believes himself the least bit superior to others the beginning of his spiritual decline commenced, all unaware to himself. --- ‘Abdu’l-Baha.

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Article Title: The advocate, September 25, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Sept. 25, 1926

INTERRACIAL TEA FOR MRS. HUNTON ATTENDED BY MANY PROMINENT PEOPLE

Seven or Eight Different Nationalities Represented
(By Ken Nakazawa)

Lavender and yellow, the colors of lilac and moonlight, constituted the color scheme at the hoome of Mr. and Mrs. E, D. Cannady in Irvington, where an interracial tea was held last Sunday from half past two to half past five o'clock in honour of Mrs. Addie W. Hunton of Brooklyn, New York, who is president of the Empiree Stae Fedeaton of Women's Clubs and International Council of Darker women of the World, meber of the National Y.W.C.A. committee of Girl Reserves, ex-Field secretay of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, member of the commission sent to investigate the condition of Haiti under American Occupation by the International League for Peace and Freedom. who is here to conclude her speaking tour on the Pacific coast. The program opened with the speech of Mrs. Josephine Othus, president of the Housewives' Council, and was continucd with the addresses by Ken Nakazawa, poet: Mrs Ida Finch, a Bahai Tcacncr, who spent four years in Japan. teaching English; Mrs Saidie Orr Duubar, executive Secretary of the Association (or the Prevention ol Tuberculosis, and ex-President of the Oregon State Federation of Women's Clubs; Rev. Frank E. Carlson, pastor of Waverly Heights Congregational Church, member of International Relations Comittee, who was sent by the National council of Congregational Churches to study the conditions in Mexico last year; Mrs. Walter Van Nuys, who is prominent in Presbyterian church circles; Mrs Millie R Trumbull, secretary Industrial Welfare Commission, Oregon State; and Mrs. Addie W. Hunton, the guest of honour. Mrs Hunton is a quiet, unassuming person and »poke in her own charming way about the need of international and interracial understanding and harmony as the essence of world peace and advancement. She is the house-guest of Mr and Mrs. Cannady and sent her message also from the pulpits at Rose City Park M E. Church to the young people of the church; Central Presbyterian Church in Laurelhurst Sunday evening and night and from Reed College Chapel Tuesday noon.

But the party was not entirely made up of speeches, for the guests were treated to a number of musical selections Mrs. Shirley McCanns, charming leader of the Roland Hayes Quartet, sang a group of Negro Spirituals, K. Y. Ahn, a talented student from Korea, accompanied by Mrs. Oliver Wickersham, who is prominent in M. E. Church circles contributed their share of melody; the Missess Nellie Franklin and Nellie Allen played piano pieces.

Distinguished among those present, there were K. Uyemura. pastor of the Japanese M. E. Church, Miss Deborah Williams of Omaha. Mrs W. F. Smith ex-president of Oregon State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs and a president of the Old Rose Club; Mrs. H M. Esterley. vice-principal of the Cady Music Education School; Miss Trevett of the Oregon Consumers' League; Mrs. A.. A. Knowlton and her mother. Mrs. Griffin: Mrs. F. L. Griffin and her mother, Mrs. Chambers, the last four named of Reed College; Harold S. Gilbert of the Gilbert Piano Company and a member of the

continued on page 4 [MISSING]


[SECOND ARTICLE]

Miss Helen Pilkington addressed the Bahai Assembly at its regular meeting on Friday evening Sept. 17.

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Article Title: The advocate, October 16, 1926, Image 1
Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Oct. 16, 1926

On Friday afternoon. October 8th at the home of Mrs, A, H, Beeson, on Glenn Avenue in Alameda. Mrs. E. D. Cannady spoke for forty minutes on on how to solve the race problem to more than half a hundred women of the Home and Foreign Missionarian Society of the United Presbyterian church. Her address was well recieved and at its close, she was presented a beautiful bouquet of gladiolas and asters by one of the members who, in fitting terms thanked the speaker for her timely discourse.

In the evening of the same day, Mrs. Cannady a made a brief talk before the regular meeting of the Bahais at 405 Yamhill Street and introduced Mrs Shirlev McCanns who gave a talk on Negro music and demonstrated some of the spirituels. Miss Faye Swain accompanied Mrs. McCanns on the piano.

Her talk and singing made a deep impression on the minds and hearts of her hearers who exressed their appreciation in many ways.

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Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Nov. 20, 1926

MRS. ALICE M. HANDSAKER SIGNALLY HONRED ON MONDAY

(Special)

Fifty-Six People Representing Several nationalites Sit at Banquet Table. Mrs. Trumbull is Toas mistress

Fifty six Portland citizens representative of several racial groups and nationalities sat at a banquet table in the A. & B. Sweet Shoppe, Monday evening at 6 o’clock and mingled their voices in praise of Mrs. Alice M. Handsaker, wife of Rev. J. J. Handsaker, for her great work toward bringing about a better understanding between the various races in the community and for unselfish life spent in the service of humanity.

As one guest described the gathering: "Just a beautiful flower garden with the white and yellow and brown races harmonizing as the white and yellow and brown chrysanthemums that adorned the center of the table."

The occasion was a belated Birthday surprise party and imagine Mrs. Handsaker’s surprise when she called at the Sweet Shoppe in response to Mrs. Cannady's request to "pick up a package and bring out to me when you come", in finding this large group of friends who arose as she entered and showered her with conratulations and Birthday greetings amid deafening applause! It was sometime before she realized what it was all about.

There was about an equal division of the white and coloured races present. Mrs. Millie R. Trumbull, another great servant of humanity, was the gracious and witty toastmistress who kept every one present in the highest of spirits.

Those who spoke were as follows: Mrs. E. D. Cannady who sponsored the affair, and who acted as hostess; Miss Sarah Evans, Inspector of the Public Markets; Dr. Elbert E. Booker, Dentist; Miss Helen Pilkington who brought greetings from the youth of Portland; Rev. John F. Moreland, pastor of First A. M. E. Zion church; Mr. George Orr Latimer, of the local Bahai Assembly; Mrs. W. F. Smith, Ex-President of the State Federation of Colored Women's (Continued on page Two)

[MISSING]


[SECOND ARTICLE]

Rev. John F. Moreland addressed the Bahai Assembly Friday night. His subject: "What Think Ye of Christ?” Mrs. E. D. Cannady sang.

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Paper Name: The Advocate, Portland, OR.
Publication Date: Nov. 27, 1926

Rev. G. G. Gardnes, pastor of Montavilla Baptist Church wishes to thank the Salvation Army and the kind Bahai friends for the generous bags of food to be distributed among his needy parishoners for Thanksgiving. A number were made more happy than they had been for a long time by reason of this generosity.

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Publication Date: Dec. 4, 1926

Continued from page one [PAGE ONE PORTION MISSING]

prominent church woman;

Mrs. E. D.Cannady, Associate editor of The Advocate; Miss Bird, President of the Zion C. E.; Mr. Brady, representing the Loyal Comrades; Mr. Vernon Baker, representing the Sunday School of Zion and Mr. E. D. Cannady, editor of The Advocate and Mrs. Dora Gulliford representing the local Bahai Assembly. Rev. and Mrs. Moreland in fitting words, responded. Delicious refreshments were served to the excellent group gathered to do honor to these two youthful workers for the upbuilding of humanity, who have won the respect and love of a large number of the people of both races. A number of their white friends and admirers were also present. The spirit manifested during the entire evening was one of love and good-will. The high note reached during the evening was the sincere desire to see Zion again take her lead among the local colored churches.

The leading women in the church arranged the reception, including Mesdames: L. A. Ashford, C. A. Jenkins, Catherine Gray, Lena Bowers, L. M. Bird and Adah McGill.

Several substantial tokens were presented to Rev. and Mrs. Moreland.

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Publication Date: Jan. 29, 1927

HOLY LAND VISITOR ENTERTAINED

Mr. John Bosch of Geyserville, California was the inspiration for a gathering of a group of colored and white friends at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Cannady in Irvington Tuesday evening.

Mr. Bosch is a leading Bahai teacher and visited the great Persian teacher, Abdul Bahai in Haifa. He also was with Abdul Baha in Chicago during Abdul Baha’s visit to America and was one of the few Americans present when the great spiritual leader passed into the Unknown at his home in Haifa.

Mr. Bosch told in his own interesting way of his teaching the great universal principles of Brotherhood, etc., in many parts of the world. He also gave a vivid account of his visit to the Holy Land and other parts of the world. Miss Marie Nadelhoffer of Illinois State, Field secretary and Dr. Talbot, Pacific coast Regional Director of the Near East Relief, both gave interesting and touching accounts of the condition of the Near East children and their need for America’s help.

Mr. Young accompanied on the piano by his wife, sang a group of songs to the delight of all.

Thc hostess, assisted by Mrs. Idela Shirkey and Miss Helen Pilkington served a light supper.

oregon_newspaper_archive_ 1926-12-04_ed-1_seq-3.pdf
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